The main nursing metaparadigm concepts in human caring theory and Persian mysticism: a comparative study

  • Lida Nikfarid Assistant professor School of Nursing & Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Nasrollah Hekmat Professor Department of Philosophy, School of Literature and Human Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.
  • Arash Vedad BSc Candidate in Nursing School of Nursing & Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Anahita Rajabi BSc Candidate in Nursing School of Nursing & Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords: Mysticism, Nursing theory, Human caring theory

Abstract

Metaparadigm concepts comprise the central issues in a discipline. Fawcett has named person, health, environment and nursing as the four main concepts of nursing that need to be comprehensively defined. The Human Caring Theory is significant because of its focus on the spiritual dimension of human beings. The aim of this study was to comparatively explain three of the main metaparadigm concepts of nursing in the Human Caring Theory and Persian mysticism, and find the similarities and differences that can help develop the theory and its application in societies with a theistic point of view. This comparative documentary study was done in two phases. First, a concept analysis was performed to find the attributes, antecedents and consequences of the concepts of human being, environment and health in the two fields of Persian mysticism and Jean Watson’s Human Caring Theory. Then they were apparently and deductively compared with each other. In spite of some similarities between the two perspectives, Persian mysticism was found to provide more comprehensive conceptualizations of the three main concepts of nursing.

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Published
2018-05-22
How to Cite
1.
Nikfarid L, Hekmat N, Vedad A, Rajabi A. The main nursing metaparadigm concepts in human caring theory and Persian mysticism: a comparative study. jmehm. 11.
Section
Original Article(s)