General approaches to ethical reasoning in Islamic biomedical ethics discourse

  • Hamideh Moosapour Evidence Based Medicine Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Jannat Mashayekhi Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Medical Ethics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Farzaneh Zahedi Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Akbar Soltani Evidence Based Medicine Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Bagher Larijani Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords: Ethical reasoning, Islamic biomedical ethics, Islamic biomedical ethics principles, Ethical decision-making

Abstract

Islamic and non-religious ethics discourses have similarities and differences at the levels of meta-, normative, and applied ethics (e.g. biomedical ethics). Mainstream biomedical ethics (MBME) uses the language of contemporary, non-religious, Western ethics. Significant effort has been dedicated to comparing Islamic biomedical ethics (IBME) and MBME in terms of meta- and normative ethical positions, and final decisions on practical ethical issues have been reached. However, less attention has been given to comparing the general approaches of the two aforementioned discourses to ethical reasoning. Furthermore, IBME uses different languages to approach ethical reasoning, but identification and conceptualization of these approaches are among the important gaps in the literature. The aim of this study was to conceptualize general approaches to ethical reasoning in IBME. Through review and content analysis of the existing literature and the comparison between the languages employed by IBME and MBME, an inductive distinction have been made. The languages used in conceptualized approaches include the followings: (i) a language in common with the one employed by MBME; (ii) MBME language adjusted to the basic, common beliefs of Muslims; (iii) a language based on fatwas; and (iv) a language based on IBME principles. In the authors’ opinion, major challenges of the above-mentioned four approaches include, respectively: identifying the lack of religious sensitivity or Islamic considerations regarding an issue; acknowledging specific beliefs as the basic, common beliefs of Muslims; diverse fatwas and relations between juridical soundness and ethical soundness; and agreement on the same principles and rules as well as who should apply them.

Author Biographies

Hamideh Moosapour, Evidence Based Medicine Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Ph.D Candidate in Philosophy of Medicine and Medical Ethics
Jannat Mashayekhi, Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Medical Ethics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Ph.D Candidate in Medical Ethics
Farzaneh Zahedi, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Director of Medical Ethics Research Group
Akbar Soltani, Evidence Based Medicine Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Professor
Bagher Larijani, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Professor

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Published
2018-09-09
How to Cite
1.
Moosapour H, Mashayekhi J, Zahedi F, Soltani A, Larijani B. General approaches to ethical reasoning in Islamic biomedical ethics discourse. jmehm. 11.
Section
Original Article(s)